Analysis of the Electronic Circuits of 11 W and 15 W Compact Fluorescent Lamps

Authors

  • M. A. Adelabu Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Lagos, 100213 Akoka, Lagos, NIGERIA
  • A. L. Imoize Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Lagos, 100213 Akoka, Lagos, NIGERIA; Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, Institute of Digital Communication, Ruhr University, 44801 Bochum, GERMANY
  • G. U. Ughegbe Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Lagos, 100213 Akoka, Lagos, NIGERIA

Keywords:

11W and 15W CFLs, AC and DC analysis, compact fluorescent lamps, current and voltage waveforms, electronic ballast, Total harmonic distortion

Abstract

The introduction of electronic ballast in lighting systems design has dramatically revolutionized the lighting space. This is orchestrated by the entrance of the Compact Fluorescent Lamps (CFLs) and Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) into the lighting market. The CFLs currently being used in domestic and industrial lighting systems provide highly competitive alternatives to conventional incandescent lamps. The electronic ballast incorporated into the CFLs helps eliminate the flickering and slow starting flaws prevalent in traditional fluorescent lamps. To properly evaluate the performance characteristics and limitations of the CFLs, a critical analysis of its electronic circuit becomes imperative. To this end, this paper presents experimental and simulation analyses of the CFL circuits. To achieve this, two Futina CFL bulbs of 11W and 15W model YPZ220/11-BMSP RR/RDD and YPZ220/15-BMSP RR/RDD, respectively, were analyzed and experimentally verified. A function-based programming paradigm was applied to develop a graphical user interface (GUI) used for the circuits analyses. The GUI is designed using MATLAB graphical user interface development environment (GUIDE). Experiments were conducted to obtain the performance characteristics of the CFLs, and measurements show that the 11W lamp has a higher amplitude than the 15W lamp. However, both lamps show similar waveforms after 300 seconds. The maximum voltage amplitudes for both CFLs are the same, with a peak value of 218V. The current waveforms in the spectral domain gave a maximum amplitude of 0.3 A for the 11W CFL and 0.2 A for the 15W. The voltage frequency (0.00196) of both CFLs are the same, whereas the current frequencies are different. This indicates that the wattage of a CFL does not affect the frequency of its voltage waveform. The frequency of the 11W CFL current (0.00157) is higher than that of the 15W CFL current (0.00784). This implies that the higher the CFL wattage, the lower the frequency of its current waveform. Additionally, simulation results revealed that the key difference between the CFLs is the current total harmonic distortion (THDI), which increases with an increasing rated power of the CFL or the aggregation of a number of the smaller rated CFLs.

http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/njt.v40i3.12

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Published

2021-06-29

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Section

Computer, Telecommunications, Software, Electrical & Electronics Engineering